Fun for Monday: The Opposites Tag

Another Monday, another tag. This one I found over at Dreamlands Book Blog where Beatrice not only shows off some of her beautiful books (I particularly love her copy of the complete Sherlock Holmes stories, it’s just sooo pretty!), but also reminds me just how expensive books can be for a lot of readers, particularly outside of the UK/US. How cool would it be to set up an international book-swapping website?   For this challenge I have tried not to mention any books that I’ve already talked about at some point on my blog. Just for fun. Watch me drop … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Opposites Tag

Fun for Monday: The Confessions Tag

I found this tag over at The Book Nut when trawling for tags to do this month while taking part in the Kushiel’s Dart read-along. Be warned: that’s all you’ll be getting from me during September – read-along posts and tags – I’m on countdown to some much-needed leave, during which time I’ll try to rebuild my store of prepared posts ready for the inevitable depression that’s on it’s way. In the meantime, forgive me fellow book-lovers for I have sinned, it has been I don’t know how long since my last confession…      Which book, most recently, did … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Confessions Tag

Fun for Monday: 7 SFF Books with Incredible Openings

The lovely Sam over at The Book in Hand does a fun thing most weekends called Sunday’s Seven and a couple of weeks ago she chose seven favourite openings from SFF books she’s read. Because sometimes you really are in or out depending on those first few sentences. As Sam has kindly given me permission to play along, here are my seven awesome opening lines, all from books I have yet to read:   The Redemption of Althalus by David & Leigh Eddings “In defense of Althalus, it should be noted that he was in very tight financial circumstances and … Continue reading Fun for Monday: 7 SFF Books with Incredible Openings

Fun for Monday: The Rainbow Tag

A tag that originated with Le Book Chronicles and that I saw first over at Reading Every Night (a blog that has the loveliest header – since I’ve started noticing these things). I’ve gone for books that are on my TBR (because so many of our already-read-and-loved books are still in boxes), and where possible I’ve tried to pick books that I haven’t mentioned before so as not to bore anyone too much.   From my point of view what better way to spend my Sunday afternoon than rummaging through books? Although, obviously reading them would be a lot more … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Rainbow Tag

Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

As comforting as the previous two Wayfarers novels and as thought-provoking, Record of a Spaceborn Few continues to explore broad themes through smaller, everyday stories. Throughout these books I’ve felt that Chambers wants to mostly show the best that people can be, and as I am always ready to read that she remains a great fit for me. So, let’s be absolutely clear: I enjoyed this a lot. My mistake, when I read A Closed a Common Orbit was to expect more of the characters from The Long Way to a Small Angry Planet and to find it wanting because … Continue reading Record of a Spaceborn Few by Becky Chambers

Fun for Monday: The Mid-Year Freak Out Tag

The Orang-utan Librarian did this tag last week and I’m jumping aboard because I wanna do a tag to cheer myself up (it’s a grumpy Sunday over here as I’m writing – I’ve no idea why). So what better way to do that than with a half-year (already?!) squeeing over books read and books still to read? Here we go …     Best Book You’ve Read So Far This Year   It’s between Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho and This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone. Don’t make me choose. … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Mid-Year Freak Out Tag

Jo Walton: Not just one world …

“Everybody has a secret world inside of them. I mean everybody. All of the people in the whole world, I mean everybody – no matter how dull and boring they are on the outside. Inside them they’ve all got unimaginable, magnificent, wonderful, stupid, amazing worlds… Not just one world. Hundreds of them. Thousands, maybe.” Neil Gaiman   Maybe you’ve read something by Jo Walton, maybe you haven’t. For such a wide-ranging and multi-award-winning author I am always surprised when her books don’t appear across a whole swathe of blogs like some others do. She is an automatic-purchase author for me … Continue reading Jo Walton: Not just one world …

Unnatural Creatures edited by Neil Gaiman & Maria Dahvana Headley

Yet again I haven’t quite read what I planned during Wyrd and Wonder month. In part, this is down to these being extraordinary times and my reading moods not being as predictable as they would normally be. Still, we roll with the punches, eh?   An interesting volume of sixteen short stories, the earliest first published back in 1885 and the most recent in 2013, Unnatural Creatures has been lurking next to the bed for the last two months as my antidote to not being able to get to sleep. Every time I’ve found myself unable to get comfortable or … Continue reading Unnatural Creatures edited by Neil Gaiman & Maria Dahvana Headley

This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone

“I want to meet you in every place I ever loved.”   How much did I love this book? Let me count the ways: I loved it for all it’s playful revelling in language, celebrating words, communication, letters (in all their forms). And, as Red and Blue’s relationship developed over the course of their correspondence, I loved that they developed something of a common language, echoing each other.   I loved the two far far futures that Red and Blue represent, and the very paradox of their romance. As they both work for their own future’s success, they do so … Continue reading This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone

Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor

I remember being so excited when I first heard about Lagoon five years ago. I’d recently been reading about how skewed the Mercator world map is, so hearing about a book in which First Contact occurred in Lagos, Nigeria instead of London or New York was perfectly timed. And sure, it’s taken me five years to actually get around to it, but having read and loved Okorafor’s Binti novellas in the meantime, none of that excitement had dissipated when I finally started reading earlier this week. “They were confused, afraid and eager to see what would happen next. How would … Continue reading Lagoon by Nnedi Okorafor