Fun for Monday: The Get to Know the Sci-Fi Reader Tag

Maryam the Curious SFF Reader found this tag over on the booktube channel BooksWithEmilyFox and answered the questions for SciFi Month back in November last year. I wasn’t able to squeeze it in back then, so the All Systems Read mini-event is the perfect excuse to do this now. Because Yay for tags!     What is the first science fiction you read? I read both The Iron Man by Ted Hughes and Eva by Peter Dickinson when I was about eight years old, and then Moonwind by Louise Lawrence when I was about ten. I’m pretty sure they were the … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Get to Know the Sci-Fi Reader Tag

Tales from the Loop by Simon Stålenhag

  “The stories I tell here are mostly based on the memories of myself and others: especially my childhood friend, Ola, who possesses a near-eidetic memory and has been able to recall all our schoolyard stories down to the smallest detail. I am eternally grateful to him for his help with the content of this book.”   The Loop. The world’s largest particle accelerator, built in Sweden in 1969. Active between 1970 when the first experiment was conducted and 1994 when it was decommissioned.   Last year I was introduced to Simon Stålenhag’s work for the first time when I … Continue reading Tales from the Loop by Simon Stålenhag

Fun for Monday: The Mid-Year Freak Out Tag

The Orang-utan Librarian did this tag last week and I’m jumping aboard because I wanna do a tag to cheer myself up (it’s a grumpy Sunday over here as I’m writing – I’ve no idea why). So what better way to do that than with a half-year (already?!) squeeing over books read and books still to read? Here we go …     Best Book You’ve Read So Far This Year   It’s between Sorcerer to the Crown by Zen Cho and This is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone. Don’t make me choose. … Continue reading Fun for Monday: The Mid-Year Freak Out Tag

The Electric State by Simon Stålenhag

  A young girl and her little bobble-headed robot travel across a dystopian America, heading for the coast. Doesn’t sound too worrying, does it? Might even be adorable. Don’t be fooled. This is an infectiously spooky, creep-inducing story told in sparse prose and stunning digital paintings. The mounting unease I felt while reading this was unexpected, but, man, did I enjoy myself. In Stålenhag’s America, circa 1997, the country (perhaps the world? We never find out) has fought some sort of massive war using technology that has allowed humans to pilot giant warships and battle-robots remotely. The scars and detritus … Continue reading The Electric State by Simon Stålenhag